COMMUNITIES

PICKENS County

Once Cherokee territory, the history of Pickens County has been evolving before the forming of our nation as we know it. You can trace this fascinating history beginning with prehistoric petroglyphs at the South Carolina Rock Art Center, explore towns that were once bustling stagecoach stops, visit one of the oldest operating grist mills in the state, appreciate the architecture of a church built in the 1700s, taste freshly picked produce from the Upcountry orchards, and plenty more.  

Designated Heritage Corridor Sites in pickens County

PICKENS COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART AND HISTORY

Housed in a 1902 Victorian jail, this museum offers an extensive overview of the region’s history—from displays on the earliest paleohunters to the Cherokee to the residents of more modern times—as well as rotating exhibits featuring the work of local artists. 

THE HAPPY BERRY

Nestled in the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains, this U-Pick berry farm is situated on the east side of Lake Keowee, the perfect landscape for growing blueberries, blackberries, figs and grapes. The Miller Family has owned The Happy Berry since 1979, but the land has a long and colorful history. The driveway to the farm is actually a part of the old road that led to the capital of the Cherokee Indians in Keowee town. It is possible that then lieutenant Andrew Pickens was entrapped by the Cherokees in the hollow on the backside of the farm during the Cherokee Indian War of 1761. Arrowheads and old musket balls are common around the farm! 

HAGOOD MILL

Built around 1825, Hagood Mill is one of the oldest known surviving grist mills still operating in South Carolina.Today the site features the gristmill, gift shop, two historic log cabins, a blacksmith shop, cotton gin building and moonshine still. Hagood Mill is famous for its mini-festivals on the 3rd Saturday of every month. 

CENTRAL HISTORY MUSEUM AND GARDENS

Once a 1893 residence, this historic building and formal rose garden features a wrap-around porch and period furnishings. The house offers a snapshot of what life was like for the original owners and also features exhibits that detail the history of the town of Central, which was named for its central location between Atlanta and Charlotte. 

BEE WELL HONEY & NATURAL MARKET

The shelves in Bee Well are stocked with everything you need to…be well, of course! Along with local honey and beekeeping supplies, the market shop features staples like bulk spices, grains, milk, butter, meats & cheeses. There’s also a wide variety of specialized gifts like candles and soaps. We recommend grabbing a cup of Bee’s Beans, fresh brewed coffee sweetened with (what else!) Bee Well honey. There’s even a drive-thru!

BOB CAMPBELL GEOLOGY MUSEUM

Located inside the Clemson University’s South Carolina Botanical Gardens, the Bob Campbell Geology Museum houses one of the most extensive faceted gem collections in the Southeast. You can also examine a number of other plant and animal fossils, meteorites, minerals and stone carvings. Admission is free.

HAGOOD MAULDIN HOUSE

Built in 1856, this tree-shaded, columned house is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. In later years, the home and office were acquired by Mrs. Irma Hendricks Morris, a noted authority on 17th and 18th century antiques. She filled the house with portraits, furniture, silver, and porcelain, now part of the Irma Morris Museum of Fine Arts.

OLD STONE CHURCH

Old Stone Church (circa 1797-1803) serves as a resting place for some of the state’s most notable individuals, including Revolutionary War General Andrew Pickens. Originally called the Stone Meeting House, the church was built with heavy materials so that it could double as a fort and protection from Native Americans if needed.

PICKENS COUNTY VETERANS MEMORIAL GARDEN

The Memorial Garden and Wall of Valor honors General Pickens and the people of Pickens County who fought and died in military service. From frontier Pendleton District and the Carolina Indian Wars and the Revolutionary War to modern Pickens County and the Global War on Terrorism, the memorial features a bronze statue of General Andrew Pickens overlooking the names of the Pickens war dead on the Wall of Valor. The statue of General Pickens is dedicated in honor of the textile workers from Pickens County who served on the home front during our wars. 

SOAPSTONE BAPTIST CHURCH

This is the oldest African American church in Upstate SC. It was formed in 1899 by freedmen who settled here after the War Between the States. A soapstone outcropping on the site gave the church its name. Church services are still held at Soapstone every Sunday and is well known for their fish fry and live music on the third Saturday of every month. 

"My wife and I love traveling in South Carolina. When we discovered the South Carolina National Heritage Corridor, it was a perfect fit for us. Now, we are regularly updated on destination spots in South Carolina. Truly a great resource."

- Mr. and Mrs. Garrison